Hot and Cold

When an idea strikes, I usually fall deeply in love with it. Maybe I’m just happy that an idea wafted through the ether and landed in my brain, but the moment of inspiration often results in a flurry of typing as I capture the elements of the idea and flesh them out as much as possible before the details escape me. It helps to have my notebook always at the ready because ideas typically strike at the most inopportune times – on a run, in the shower, in a meeting at work, basically any time my mind is allowed to wander (Look! A squirrel!)

Once an idea becomes enshrined in my endless notebook (it is electronic after all), I like to let it gestate for a while. In some cases, I may not revisit it for weeks or months. It’s during that period that I learn if the idea will be worth promoting to the esteemed level of a draft chapter. If it survives, then I’ll write a first chapter or a concept chapter for the story to see if I like it or not. If the story has legs, then I’ll continue to work on it, but many ideas are left in the first (and only) chapter graveyard. Writing that first chapter really tells me if the story will work or not. It may just be my mood, or I may find another idea that I like better (Look! Another squirrel!).

Many ideas die on the vine. It’s a fact of life for a writer. Sometimes, two ideas collide and become one. On more than one occasion, I’ve had a new idea that I’ve simply integrated into an existing one to make (hopefully) a stronger and better story out of the original concept. This happened recently when I had a new idea about two people intimately drawn together by unseen and unexplained forces. Instead of making this a story in and of itself, I integrated the idea as a subplot into a draft novel I’ve been outlining called Someone Like You, a love story of sorts but please don’t call it that because it’s more akin to The Great Gatsby than any forlorn romance novel.

The sad reality remains that I have more ideas than time, but also, ideas seem to be a dime a dozen. So many start out promising only to lose their sizzle. This happens at any point along the way to a draft novel. I sometimes lose my enthusiasm for whatever reason, and when my enthusiasm fades, writing the story feels like trudging through a mud pit in heavy, steel-toed boots. It all boils down to the characters I create. I become them in many ways and as long as I can feel them on some ethereal level, I can keep writing, but the moment that feeling ebbs, the story slows to a crawl and may eventually peter out completely.

Writing a novel isn’t easy. Everything I’ve read from accomplished writers suggests this is true beyond me. The opening chapters are often like firework shows in that they are loud, generally flamboyant, and short, but then, the dreaded middle has to be written, and that’s where it becomes an uphill grind. The middle loses many a reader, but it also squashes the hopes of many a writer. Handling that transition well ultimately determines which ideas survive and thrive in novel land.

It doesn’t help that the creative juices can run hot and cold. Some mornings writing is like riding a bike. On others, it’s like taking a test for which I have not studied, a bang-my-head-on-my-desktop experience that leaves me wanting to go back to bed and start over. Maybe there are just too many distractions. Maybe I’m just too moody. Maybe…look a squirrel!

 

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