The World We Must See

I’m just back from vacation with my soon-to-be 12-year-old son. I took him on a trip to New York City to catch the sights and sounds of one of the most dynamic cities in the world. We visited many of the usual tourist spots in the city including the 9/11 Memorial, the Statue of Liberty, and, of course, the iconic Empire State Building. As much as this trip was about fun, it was also about giving my son some experiences outside the norm of his everyday life. It’s too easy for all of us to become cloistered in our own little space in the world and fail to see all the wonderful things that surround us. Too many adults I know have very limited experience outside their immediate area and view the world through the myopic lens of TV and internet news, which do nothing but promote fear and ignorance.

If my kids learn nothing from me (that’s possible given how well they listen to what I say), I hope they at least are able to see past all of the negativity and make their own, informed decisions about the world around them. The beauty of it lies in its variety, and the differences that sometimes separate us shouldn’t be feared but embraced. Nowhere is this more evident than in New York City where the concept of the American melting pot is on full display. You can practically travel around the world just by walking its streets. This is the world I want my kids to see. It’s exciting, vibrant, and full of life.

I didn’t have an opportunity to travel until I was 25 years old, and once I did, I began to realize a lot of my preconceived notions about the world were wrong. Even at the height of my youthful enthusiasm back then, I held many ignorant beliefs that were clearly unfounded once I gained some experience outside of my own little world. At that time, I thought my education was over since I had recently finished college, but the truth was that it was just beginning. By the time I reached 30 years of age, my entire world view had changed. I had a much greater appreciation for the differences that sometimes divide us but mostly make the world much more interesting and exciting. I’m thankful for the opportunities that I’ve had and the lessons I’ve learned. Now, I just hope that my kids can catch on a little earlier in their lives than I did.

Their young lives have certainly been different from mine when I was a kid. They’ve lived in a foreign country and visited several more. My son has been on four different continents already. Of course, my kids are too young to appreciate any of this at the moment, but years later, when they look back at their lives, I hope they see that these experiences gave them a foundation to look beyond the noise around them and challenge preconceived notions and unfounded fears to see the world for what it really is. That’s my hope at least.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s